2017-12-09

Ideal Management

Opinion

Anyone that knows me that I read a great deal, and one of the topics I focus on is management and leadership. It has meant attending B-school, reading books on management, as well as reading numerous articles and studies - I definitely prefer to base my ideas on statistical proof - so I think I have a good sense of what research says excellent management and leadership means. After reading a blog post that resonated with me, but I thought overly-specific, I decided to abstract that article's rules into something generic, add some needed items, then convert those items into practice.

The only issue is that this list is a bit of a 'kitchen-sink-laundry-list' including everything without concern for the appropriateness. When I look through my history, very few managers have been what I saw as truly excellent. For other items, they were not specifically a manager's duty but were provided by the organization, such as with providing training.

The Source

How to Tell If You're a Great Manager:
2017-11-29

Software engineers will be obsolete by 2060

In response to an article on Medium, Software engineers will be obsolete by 2060, I responded with the following:

Interesting article on The Economist titled Automation on Automation Angst, http://www.economist.com/node/21661017, that looks at several publications that look at the historical effects of automation, and although there is always a fear of being replaced, ultimately more jobs are created than destroyed. Software engineers disappear? So what! There will be other jobs, with different titles, and in the interim, the more people use tech, the more there will be a need for software engineers.

Because of this, a person asked for my opinion on maintaining their career as a .NET developer, to which I responded:

Although I am a .NET developer as well, I focus on expanding my project management and leadership skills, as well as developing skills in AI/ML. Rather than bore with all the details of my background, here is what I think:
Somewhat more generally:
2017-11-27

Using Visual Studio Team Services for Personal Development

The complete post is published on my Data Analytics blog as Using Visual Studio Team Services for Personal Development, the following just a quick introduction.

Microsoft provides free access to its online Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS), and for some time I've been using the service, I've wanted to restructure my code hierarchy, and recent changes in my work environment, automated build and deployment using Octopus, nudged me to finally take the task on, so in the past few weeks I’ve:

View of Project Dashboard
2017-11-14

Pinterest as a Publication Channel for Data Analytics

More as an experiment, rather an attempt at sharing code and ideas, I created a Pinterest board devoted to my personal data analytics work, done with Python, R, or F#, as well as reviews of books, and was quite surprised with the result.

View of Pinterest showing Pins displaying code links

The graphics could do with optimization, but otherwise...
2017-11-09

Deep Learning and Toolkits


Bookcover image for Fundamentals of Deep Learning As part of reading Fundamentals of Deep Learning: Designing Next-Generation Machine Intelligence Algorithms by Nikhil Buduma, I was expecting to work through the code examples with my own data, and for the library, it recommended TensorFlow, which brings up competing alternatives, a primary one being Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit. Over the next few weeks, I will start exploring both in Python, as well as publishing some of the related work.

A minor note, the darksigma/Fundamentals-of-Deep-Learning-Book: Code companion to the O'Reilly "Fundamentals of Deep Learning" book is available on GitHub.
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